Tag Archives: hand-dyed fabrics

Ice-dyeing – “it’s all in the folding” – Part 2

As I wrote in Part 1, I had such a lot of fun with the ice-dyeing – folding fabric, placing in colanders and on racks, covering with ice and then sprinkling with dye powders, until I ran out of ice – ouch!  Weekend and local store closed early, I didn’t want to wait until tomorrow, so came up with plan B –  there was no point in wasting all that folding energy, and wicking would be a good way to use up left over liquid dyes.

I started with red – two different dyes mixed together and some poured into the bottom of a flat bowl, quickly dip the folded fabric into it, count to 5 and turn the fabric over, count to 5 again and remove to a clean bowl – leave overnight.

Wicking - various reds mixed together

Wicking – various reds mixed together

As you can see, there is a lot of white there – the fabric was folded very tight and not much liquid dye, and one of the reds separated, you can see the yellow circle.  It looked stunning on the wall.

For the next one I used 2 colours – Yellow 2R/yellow 8G mix for the first dip, and Violet RA for the second dip. This fabric was wetter than the red one above, and so the dye moved much quicker and further.

Wicking - Procion Violet RA and Yellow 2RA

Wicking – Procion Violet RA and Yellow 2RA

Some of these are two different colours, but most are of one colour made with two different dyes.

Wicking with Procion Indigo MX

Wicking with Procion Indigo MX

I love this Indigo colour, just like the real indigo without the mess, and you can get paler or darker much easier.  It is available from Dharma in the USA.

Wicking - Turquoise & Ultramarine blues

Wicking – Turquoise & Ultramarine blues

Wicking - Fuschia and Red 5B mix

Wicking – Fuschia Red 8B, and Red 5B mix

Wicking - pastel blue & purple mix

Wicking – pastel blue & purple mix

Wicking - Various yellows mixed

Wicking – Various yellows mixed

Wicking - Ruby red on only one folded edge

Wicking – Ruby red on only one folded edge

Wicking - olive green mix

Wicking – olive green and green MX mix

Wicking - Violet RA & Yellow 2RA

Wicking – Violet RA & Yellow 2RA

Close-up - Violet & Yellow wicking

Close-up – Violet & Yellow wicking

Wicking - sky blue & lime green

Wicking – sky blue & lime green

Lime green - split colour

Lime green – split colour

Close-up of lime green split

Close-up of lime green split

Wicking - sky blue & lime green

Wicking – sky blue & lime green

Close-up of sky blue & lime green wicking

Close-up of sky blue & lime green wicking

Wicking sky blue & lime green

Wicking sky blue & lime green

As you can see, wicking produces some interesting results, a bit more planned than dyeing under ice, even though the folding is the same.

The drier the fabric, the more white, and the wetter the fabric the more wicking and spreading of colour.

One dye which consistently separates is the lime green, sometimes there is more yellow and other times a hint of blue in the separation. I haven’t worked out what the catalyst is yet – sometimes it is the temperature of the water when mixing the dye in the first place, but not always, and other times I can’t work out a reason at all.

Thank you for reading this far, now it’s your turn to try out some of these techniques and leave a comment on your results below.

Keep smiling, the silly season is nearly over 🙂

A Happy New Year to all my readers.

Ice-dyeing – “it’s all in the folding” – Part 1

A few weeks ago I delved into my bucket of pre-soda-soaked cotton fabric – there’s always a few metres ready to use.  After a bit of ripping and tearing, I had enough fat quarters, half metres and bit-over-a-metre-squares, for a whole day’s dyeing.

Some fabric was still damp, so it was easy to fold, and the really dry pieces were dunked back into the soda ash.  A while later I had a basket ready for dyeing.

Fabric parcels ready to go

Fabric parcels ready to go

I am a great fan of the mandala, especially the kaleidoscopic designs.  Ice-dyeing is a quick and easy way to achieve them. It’s all in the folding ….

There are plenty of books available for fabric folding as well as videos on u-tube, so I won’t go into it here.

Place the fabric parcel in a colander or similar, suspended over a bucket, cover with ice blocks (e.g. party ice), and then sprinkle dry dye powder (Procion MX dyes) over the ice which is above the fabric, one, two or three colours will give you an amazing kaleidoscope.  Every piece will be a wonderful surprise, there are no bad results, only very different from what you thought possible.  Experiment, experiment, experiment….

Ice over fabric

Dyes sprinkled over ice and fabric

Dyes sprinkled over ice and fabric

Leave until ice melts, batch overnight and  next day rinse in the usual way – voila –

Kaleidoscopic mandala

The one above is a largish piece, a bit over the metre square, but the ones below are all fat quarters. The dyes used in the purple fabrics were Violet RA and Aubergine, mixed together dry, and sprinkled over.  One of them split the pale blue, very pretty.

The dyes used in the green fabric were olive, lichen and green MXG, mixed dry. In the bottom 3 fabrics, I used lime, lichen and yellow 2RA, mixed dry, fabric is actually more yellowy then the photo shows.

ice-dye-10a-violet-ra-aubergine-web

ice-dye-10b-violet-ra-aubergine-webice-dye-10c-violet-ra-aubergine-webice-dye-10d-violet-ra-aubergine-webice-dye-10f-violet-ra-aubergine-webice-dye-11-olive-lichen-green-webice-dye-12-lime-lichen-sun-yellow-webice-dye-13-lime-lichen-sun-yellow-webice-dye-14-lime-lichen-sun-yellow-web

At this point I ran out of ice, and being a Sunday afternoon, the local store closes early, so what to do now?  Plan B is in the next post.

Till then, keep smiling.  🙂

 

Dyeing classes for summer 2015-2016

the grass is riz, the lawn needs mowing, but to the studio is where I’m going! Apologies to whoever wrote the old phrase “Spring is sprung, the grass is riz……”

With longer days and warmer temperatures, I’m spending lots of time in my studio dyeing and painting, and I can’t wait for really warm (hot) weather to start up an indigo vat also.

Dates have been set for my dyeing classes (play days for fabriholics) .  If you are interested in any of them, leave a comment below and I’ll send you the list of requirements.

Dyeing workshops – summer 2015–2016.  Second Saturday each month

October 10 – Dyeing day with Procion MX dyes. Using pure primary colours and not-pure primary colours, we will create some stunning bright and pastel neutral shades. Cotton or silk fabrics only.

November 14 – Painting day. Hoping for a sunny day, we will do some sun dyeing, shibori painting, and sun printing using found objects as a resist. Any fabric except wool will work for this.

December 12 – Dyeing with indigo. Explore this ancient method of changing colours. Try various shibori techniques. Works with any fabrics that are light to medium in colour.

January 9 – Create a piece of fabulous art cloth. Explore various methods of transferring designs on to fabric, using rubber stamps, wood blocks, gelli plates, monoprinting, and removing colour from the fabric with discharge paste and/or bleach products.

February 13 – to be decided.

March 12 – long weekend, we may change the date.

All classes are held here in my studio at Flowerpot, 9.30am to 4pm-ish.

New studio – in for the weekend and out again on Monday

The Channel Art Trail with it’s exhibitions and open studios happened over this last weekend.  Although my studio is still in a state of “not quite finished”, the builders were very good and vacated for a couple of days so that we could set up our displays.  The weather had been pretty awful in the days leading up, and there was mud everywhere, as is commonly the case on building sites.

To enable access to the front door, as the deck has not been built on yet, a temporary catwalk was constructed from old pallets and sheets of flooring, with a door mat either end, it worked very well.  The photos can tell you the story.

Pondering the next step

Pondering the next step

Add a few more pallets and another plank

Add a few more pallets and another plank

A little later and nearly to hard ground

A little later and nearly to hard ground

And on Saturday the sun came out 🙂

Early morning outside after the clean up

Early morning outside after the clean up

Meanwhile inside a lot had been happening.  First the ‘soft’ design wall had to be constructed – a layer of cotton quilt batting glued directly to the styrene wall, and several lengths of heavy curtain lining called bumf (spelling?) which is like a very fine woven but thick flannelette fabric sewn together and stretched down the length of the wall, 7.5m down one wall and 3m on the shorter wall.  We tested the strength with a heavy bed quilt pinned with only 3 pins in the top – wonderful, even without the pins it stuck to the wall! Then we covered it over with black plastic so that no plaster or paint would splash on to it.

Here’s some more pictures.

Styrene wall ready for covering

Styrene wall ready for covering

First layer is cotton quilt batting

First layer is cotton quilt batting

 

Multi-skilled builder handy with the iron

Multi-skilled builder handy with the iron

Ready for the top layer of bumf

Ready for the top layer of bumf (or bumph ?)

Top layer before final stretching and stapling

Top layer before final stretching and stapling

And we only used 2 cans of glue

And we only used 2 cans of glue

Test strength with heavy quilt - only needed 3 pins at the top

Test strength with heavy quilt – only needed 3 pins at the top

Design wall covered with plastic for the plasterers

Design wall covered with plastic for the plasterers

Cleaning plaster scraps from floor

Cleaning plaster scraps from floor

Happy to watch this paint dry

Happy to watch this paint dry

Looks so lovely and clean

Looks so lovely and clean

A large empty space full of potential ready and waiting –

First load of boxes arrive

First load of boxes arrive

This is outside

This is outside

One end for Jen

And inside – one end for Jen

And the other end for me

And the other end for me

Plenty of room for displays

Plenty of room for displays

More of Jen's work

More of my work

Demonstration tables

Demonstration tables

Entrance catwalk

Entrance catwalk

Directional bunting

Directional bunting

The view outdoors

The view outdoors

 

Some of my collections

Some of my collections of quirky teapots and old irons – tiny ones are for lace

And lastly, what it looked like after the removalists arrived – we had to empty the space for the builders to come back at 7am on Monday to get on with the plastering

Removalists moved in

Removalists moved in

Next morning the plasterers were back at it

Next morning the plasterers were back at it

Thank you for reading this far, it has been a very long post, there was a lot I wanted to tell you about.

Keep smiling 🙂

 

Stack of books ready for markets

Over the last couple of weeks I have been making lots of covers for notebooks and diaries.  I had quite a production line going.

First, was cutting lots of 9-inch wide strips of iron-on pellon

Pellon

Then choosing fabrics

Fabrics 1

Fabrics 2

Fabrics 3

Fabrics 4

Fabrics 5

Cutting into mounds of strips all one and a half inches wide –

Pile of strips

And sewing onto the pellon as quilt-as-you-go –

Piecing in progress

To make these lovely pieces of stripped fabrics –

Strip pieced fabrics

Strip pieced fabrics 2

Strip pieced fabrics 3Then choosing a book from the pile –

Pile of new booksAnd trimming the fabric to size, and fancy stitching the edges –

Fancy edge stitchingTo make these covers –

Book covers 1Book covers 2Book covers 3Book covers 4Book cover 5This one is my favourite, and I think I will keep it for myself –

Red book coverAll finished and stacked ready on the ‘shelf’.  Visual diaries on the left, calendar diaries in the middle and lined notebooks on the right.  Smaller sized books flat on the table.  The display includes the few I had left from market days.

Shelf of books

I think that’s enough books for a while, for markets as well as taking to the Deloraine Craft Fair in 3 weeks’ time.

Tomorrow, I am back in my studio.  As it is forecast to be quite warm, I think I will be painting the fabric for the quilt I want to take to Deloraine !

Markets and Dyeing to Felt

It’s been quite a while since I last wrote here. I’ve been home from my travels for some weeks I know, but I have been busy, first getting results of our quilt exhibition (which was the weekend we returned home) on to the Tasmanian Quilting Guild’s website, and other committee things for the guild as well. I will be putting up on a separate page some of my 2000 photos I took while in Europe, and including quilts from the festival in Ireland, soon.

Markets are happening every couple of weeks for me again, even though it is still winter they are popping up everywhere. I have been to Kingston Beach Handmade Market twice, back to Snug market (which was not good at all for me), and of course to the Tas Quilting Guild’s Friendship Day in Launceston, which is always a wonderful day for everyone there – members, friends, and traders alike.

Fabrics, threads & books at Friendship Day

Fabrics, threads & books at Friendship Day

KBHM market table

KBHM market table

Selection of scarves at Kingston Beach market

Selection of scarves at Kingston Beach market

All these markets have meant getting back to work quickly as stock in some areas is dwindling.  My dyed and felted cotton journals (which sell for $18.50) have all gone and only a couple of small ones (selling at $15.00) are left. Here are a couple of pieces of cotton felt.  The one with squares was indigo dyed a long time ago, and as the dye didn’t take very well to the dry cotton, I overdyed it with colour and it looks so good now. The cotton felt just soaks up the procion dyes so easily, whereas the indigo … well, I’m not sure …

Dyed cotton felt

Dyed cotton felt

Over-dyed cotton felt

Over-dyed cotton felt

The Guild’s challenge for 2013 is “Birds”, and I have painted some fabric which looks like feathers.  I took some to the Friendship Day last Saturday  as a sample, and before I could make the announcement that I had the fabric, it all sold except one piece – so when the sun comes out again, I’ll be painting some more feathers.

Feather fabric before ironing

Feather fabric before ironing

Feather fabrics after ironing

Feather fabrics after ironing

In the meantime, here are a couple of photos from last week.

Snow on Mt Wellington

Snow on Mt Wellington

Spectacular sunrise over the Channel

Spectacular sunrise over the Channel

I made a cake for my youngest daughter’s birthday last week, and put 21 or 22 raspberries around the top – (I couldn’t count to 40 could I?)  Absolutely no calories worth speaking about, and it was demolished in seconds !  🙂

Jen's birthday cake

Jen’s birthday cake

Keep smiling

Lots of dyeing – scarves and art cloth

It’s always a fun day when I’m dyeing silk scarves.  Mixing colours and techniques makes for some surprising results.  This picture shows some of he colours.

The “spotty” scarves – silk organza with cotton bobbles woven – react differently to different dyes.  The pale blue one was dyed using Landscape dye in the microwave – the silk came out a beautiful colour blue with the cotton staying white, and the orange/green one and the deep burgundy/purple one were dyed with procion dyes, and the cotton bobbles accepted the dye in varying degrees depending on the strength of the dye I was applying.  They look very interesting when actually being worn.

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The stripey scarves are silk with rayon ribbon woven in the check design.  They reacted similarly, in that the green one was dyed in the microwave and the rayon didn’t accept the dye very readily, but the red one (moroccan red/aubergine mix) was dyed with procion and the rayon is a very rich colour.

A couple of days later, I had to do some more dyeing (my excuse was to use up the dyes while they were still good, with the weather as warm as it was!) – this time lots of fabric.

???????????????????????????????Here it is drying after soaking in soda ash for a couple of hours.

My plan was to dye large pieces with two or three colours and see how they mixed together on the fabric.

I mixed up a fresh lot of lichen procion and poured some onto the first piece of fabric, and watched it separate as it touched the fabric – there was such a variety of colour changes I decided not to add anything to this one.  The rinsed out fabric is green, from yellow mustard through grass to lime – a really beautiful piece, and I forgot to take a photo, but you can see some of the variations on the batching fabric here.

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Then it was three colours on each fabric.  Here they are nicely dried while batching in the sun

what looks blue is really much greener, a deep teal green, and the purple is very purple. My camera makes everything very blue if there is any blue in the colour at all.

Here are the rinsed and ironed fabrics.  The colours used were lichen, golden yellow, aubergine, navy, teal green, primary red and moroccan red, in different combinations on each piece.

You can see I had lots of fun with this lot.  Next thing is to get them ready for sale, at $30/metre, either a cut metre or the whole piece which is approx 3m for $90.  I’m just an email away if you are interested.  The full length pieces would make excellent basis for art cloth manipulations.

Till next time, keep smiling.  🙂

Kingston Beach Handmade Market and sun painting art cloth

Deloraine craft fair is over for another year.  It was very successful for me, talked myself hoarse, saw lots of old friends and met new ones, and sold heaps.

No time to slack off when I got home, it was back to the dyeing studio, to replace the scarves I had sold.

Sunday I was off to the new Kingston Beach Handmade Market at Kingston Beach, the beachside suburb of Hobart.  It was the first day of what looks like being a very good market to be held monthly on the second Sunday.  All stallholders have to apply, and are accepted for their individuality and there’s no duplicating of stalls, giving a greater variety for the visitors.  I’m in again for the next market on 9 December, should be good as it’s Christmas shopping time.

This was my stall, just inside the front door of the hall, my back to the wall so I could display my ladies to advantage.

Flowerpot Quilts at Kingston Beach Handmade Market 11 Nov 2012

There was live entertainment on the stage during the day, this is a choir whose wonderful voices could be heard over the crowds in the hall, and caused much chattering to be a lot quieter.

This photo was taken early in the day before the crowds filled up.

Today being nice and sunny, it was time to do some sun-dyeing.  I have a project on the go that requires some sepia coloured fabric similar to what I used i n my Flowerpot Quilt a couple of months ago.  Using some Dy na flow Ecru and Ochre with an odd drop or two of black I managed to produce these pieces.

The first one got rumpled when the wind flipped it before it was properly dry – a definite diagonal change in colour.

Sun painted 1

Then the next ones, better colour coverage.  The freckles are little bumps in the gravel road surface, and add texture which will do for my purpose perfectly.

sun painted 2

sun painted 3

I’ll have more for you in a couple of weeks when there is something to show.  I’ll keep you in suspense a little longer.

Till next time keep on smiling 🙂

Setting up at Deloraine Craft Fair

After a very wet start to the day, and rain all the way to Deloraine, 4 hours drive, the sun came out late in the day, hopefully a good omen for tomorrow.

Usually I stop in Campbell Town for a quick lunch when travelling north, but we decided to stop in Ross instead – able to park in front of the little cafe, instead of walking a distance in the rain at Campbell Town.  To cut a long story short, we sat in the car for lunch in front of the Scotch Thistle Inn, which had this magnificent specimen of wisteria, trained to look like a tree –

Wisteria tree in front of the Scotch Thistle Inn at Ross

By the time we reached Deloraine, the rain had eased and the sun came out.  Three hours later and my stall is all set up and waiting for the first visitors early tomorrow morning.  This is what you see when you walk in the door to the pavilion –

This is what greets you as you step in the door to the pavilion

I have a large strip light above, and the sun streams in through the clear roof, nice and bright.  This is the view back to the other end of my space –

Looking the other way

Not a good photograph, the camera didn’t like all the bright light, and my little spotlight looks like a torch in the night.

My ladies are now dressed in co-ordinating colours and outfits

You can actually see the tree in the quilt, the light is just right

My Fireworks and Tall Timbers quilts.  The tree is very hard to see in many situations, because of the organza overlay which reflects back any bright light, but here it is just right.

This lovely piece of art cloth will be draped along the front of the table tomorrow.

Piece of art cloth about 1m square

Hoping to see some of you over the weekend, keep smiling.  🙂

Deloraine Craft Fair

At last I am quite excited to be an exhibitor at the annual Craft Fair in Deloraine.

The car is packed with everything except my personal things – the morning will do for that.  So now I can relax and stop feeling so stressed out, about being ready in time.  DD Jen came round this afternoon to help organise what went where, and the car is very full. She’s a very good organiser when it comes to that sort of thing 🙂

( I forgot to get a picture before it got dark tonight, as I have my female busts in the back window, naked and boobs facing the ceiling ! 🙂   I wonder how many cars will be passing me on the highway tomorrow to get a better look at the crazy person driving 🙂  )

The fair is on from Friday 2 November to Monday 5 November, 9am to 5pm except for Monday when it closes at 4 or 4.30.

I will be at the Showgrounds venue, in the Furmage pavilion, right where the free shuttle bus drops passengers.  My stall in number 775, just inside the door on your left.

I would love you to come and say hello when you are in the vicinity.

Here are a few of the things I will have on my stall.  I may have shown some of these photos before, but that doesn’t matter.

some special scarves

Bright cover on diary

blue quilted and felted notebook cover

rich purple silk velour scarf

Delicate chiffon velour

silk and rayon shawl

silk habutai with discharged stencil design

blue silk gauze with cotton bobbles